Handling Generation Y (Millennials)

Generation Y refers to the millennial generation. This generation is composed of children born between 1982 and 1995 to the late baby boomers. Parents kept their children’s lives structured busily both in academics and extra-curricular activities. Young millennials mostly spent many hours on the computer, often the Internet, interacting with peers, doing school work, and […]

Handling Generation Y (Millennials)

Generation Y refers to the millennial generation. This generation is composed of children born between 1982 and 1995 to the late baby boomers. Parents kept their children’s lives structured busily both in academics and extra-curricular activities. Young millennials mostly spent many hours on the computer, often the Internet, interacting with peers, doing school work, and playing games during their vacant time.

Their heavy mass media exposure made them self-confident, extremely social, technologically sophisticated, action bent, goal oriented, service-minded, and accustomed to functioning as part of a team. However, they are also impatient, demanding, stressed out, sheltered, materialistic and self-centered.

With so much activity in their lives and constant communication with friends and family mostly computers and cell phones, they have little time for reflection or self-examination. They do not hunger for independence from their parents. Quite the contrary, they stay close to the parents and turn to their them for help when something doesn’t meet their needs.

This generation values money and what it can buy due to mass media promotions. These young people face the prospect of being the first generation that cannot afford a standard of living just like their parents, let alone higher.

Despite the difficulties millennials may present, this generation can be easy to reach if we make a few adjustments in handling them because they are goal-oriented, positive-minded, and technologically savvy. They are intelligent enough to have learned a lot. Our adjustments need not include lowering our own standards but we need to set our limits.

They are understandably cynical about authority and don’t assume its their best interests we have at heart. Millennials also want to know that we care about them. Remember that they are still attached to their parents. They tend to be childish and accustomed to near-constant interaction. To show them that we care about their well-being, we do whatever it takes to help them learn.

On the other hand, Generation Y is likely to multitask with technology inappropriately. They are accustomed to using technology but do not understand how this multitasking is perceived as rude or distracting especially when they are inside their classrooms.

Generation Y wants work-life balance which means that work does not come first. Millennials do not look at an organization to see how they will fit into it; rather, they look at how that organization will fit into their lives.This is a challenge for older generations to understand.

They want to have a close relationship with authority figures, just like their parents. They want to feel that supervisors care about them personally.They prefer to work with superiors who are approachable, supportive, good communicators, and good motivators. Additionally, millennials feel comfortable sharing their opinions and feedback without respect to the appropriate organization hierarchy.

Amazingly, however, but Generation Y responds well to structure, discipline, rules, and regulations.

Arthurkingsla-21
UK

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